Samtosha – Patanjali’s Yoga Sutras

Pada  II. Sutra 42
Samtosad  anuttamah sukha labhah
From contentment, supreme happiness is gained.

Contentment comes from a place of having peace with our selves, in this peace within, our desires come from love. When resting in this love within, our desires are naturally supportive of both our selves and of others.

It is nothing wrong with desires, the problem arises when our desires are not aligned with love. In the world now there is a lot of people following their desires out of fear, and we have created a world out of balance.

On our path of going inwards and unveiling what we have suppressed and getting familiar with how our internal thought patterns work, we can more easily recognize if our desires come from love or from a negative pattern/fear. These patterns are often unconscious and we might not even know that we are driven by fear.

We might be on a quest of attaining more wealth or more power, and these desires for more can come from a desire that is based in for instance a fear of there not being enough or a fear of losing our position. When we become aware of our subconscious fears we have a chance to make different choices, when we are not aware of these fears they tend to run our lives without us even noticing it.

If we try to be content from the level of thinking, it can in itself become a self-destructive pattern of “I shouldn’t desire this, and I shouldn’t want that…”, this can just create more stress and is certainly not aligned with our first yama which is ahimsa. What we rather could do, instead of judging our desires, is to look within and notice where they are coming from. In meditation we can recognize the feelings on a deeper level and see if our desires comes from fear or if it comes from love. It might take some time and practice to notice this as we have layers of beliefs that will dissolve in its own pace when we start looking inwards. With some desires we can more easily recognize where they stem from, and we can see clearly just by asking our selves “will this bring me and others more happiness?”

In our physical yoga practice what typically can take us out of our presence, is that we should be somewhere else with our bodies, we should be stronger or more flexible. Again, it is nothing wrong with this desire in itself, but it might come from a fear based thinking of not feeling good enough exactly as you are right now. This drive forward and pushing our selves, both in yoga and in life, can lead to injuries in yoga and illness from living a too hectic life. When we are constantly trying to be better, look better or do better, we live life in fear, we create more stress in our body and mind.

If we step behind the thinking of “we should be better or somewhere else then we are right now, in our lives, with our bodies or with our emotions”, we can start to recognize where this thinking come from. Where is the feeling sitting inside of you where you believe you should be better? From noticing and allowing emotions space within, we create room for fears to start dissolving, not by pushing them away or judging our selves for being fearful or having negative emotions (we all have them!), but by allowing it space within.

Be content with what you have; rejoice in the way things are. When you realize there is nothing lacking, the whole world belongs to you.
Lao Tzu

 

Satya – Patanjali’s Yoga Sutras

Pada II. Sutra 36
Satya pratisthayam kriya phala asrayatvam
From reversing to stability of truthfulness,
all actions quickly results in their fruits.

Satya is the second of the five observances (yama – literally deaths) to obtain through meditation and increased self-awareness.

To be completely truthful is impossible when our mind is clouded with unconscious thinking and inherited patterns that contradicts our deeper truth.
We are brought up in a society that early teaches us that we have to strive to be something other than what we are in this moment. We inherit patterns both from our parents and the tendency of our ancestors and from the society and country we live in and the world as a whole.

We are taught what is good and bad behavior, which emotions are accepted to show and feel, which ones are not, what schools is more beneficial or prestigious to attend and which jobs would be more secure or maybe give us fame and fortune.

A lot of our choices are made from ambitions and outer expectations, expectations which we internalize and make our own the older we get. We end up believing we have chosen what we wanted all the way, but we were conditioned and might have ended up in a place where we are not entirely happy. Or maybe have made the choices that feels good also on a deeper level, but still we are not quite happy as our mind has a tendency to continue to search for something else or something more.

When we go within and start releasing the thought patterns and subconscious beliefs we have inherited, we get more in touch with our true selves and with our true desires. We let go of our fear of being fully who we are and we let go of the fear of making choices from our heart.

The more we let go of these layers holding us back, the more our inner truth shines through, the more truthful we can be towards our selves, how we live our lives and how we choose to present our selves to others.

“This sutra means that we no longer undermine our thoughts, speech, desires and actions by self-contradictory and self-destructive thoughts, speech, desires and actions. Therefore, whatever we do, we receive full support from all the Laws of Nature; all desires are quickly fulfilled.”
“The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali” Translation and commentary by MSI

 

“In the light of steady self-awareness, inner energies wake up and work miracles without any effort on your part”
Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj

 

Ahimsa – Patanjalis Yoga Sutras

Pada II. Sutra 35
Ahimsa pratisthayam tat samnidhau vaira tyagah
“From reversing to stability of non-violence,
all hostility is renounced in your presence
.”

letting-go

 

 

Ahimsa is for me one of the most useful guidelines to remember when practicing yoga and meditation. Both when it comes to our physical yoga practice, our meditation practice and in life in general, remembering to practice ahimsa brings more gentleness and ease.

It has been especially useful to apply this principle in my meditation and when noticing the tendency of the mind to be critical. While sitting in meditation with an intention of integrating Ahimsa, it is easier to become aware of the state of the mind that limits and criticizes and rather learn to rest in the peaceful nature of our mind.

When we stop criticizing our selves, it is easier to also view the world with more loving eyes and experience the world as a friendlier place. The mind is used to constantly evaluate every person, experience and one self. It is nothing wrong with this evaluation in it self, but it becomes challenging when we take our judgments and analyzes for truth.

In Ahimsa I experience a letting go, a surrender to something bigger, a gentleness within and an experience of humbleness, like everything in my experience becomes softer and more at ease. In letting go I have to let go of everything I believe I know and rather experience this moment and everything in it directly.

For instance in meeting with a new person or someone I already know, letting go of everything I believe about him or her, can create a whole new way of relating to an other. We become more open, more innocent and also we allow this person to be who ever he or she is in this moment. We become more alive, we are more present in the love within and there is a deeper connection with one another. We experience each other in what we are behind the thinking level of the mind. It is also from this state easier to practice forgiveness, as there is an understanding that anything hurtful said or done are coming from the places where this person is hurt.

When approaching our yoga practice in this way, we can let go of every idea about our body and our selves, staying present with the experience right now can give us a deeper experience in the yoga practice. You can explore and be curious to how each pose feels in the body? Where is your spine in space? Can you create a sense of more space and softness in the body while still staying strong? Can you accept where you are right now and stop looking for the next pose or the wish to be stronger or more flexible where you are now? What is the quality of your breath? Can you notice your minds tendency to comment on your practice?

When you approach your meditation with ahimsa, you can start noticing where your mind tends to judge. Do you try to go deeper in meditation in a way of forcing your awareness? Do you try to push away thoughts or escape emotions or uncomfortable physical sensations? Can you accept the experience as it is now and find the most easeful way of relaxing in your awareness? Can you accept everything or maybe the nothingness that goes on in your awareness right now? Can you notice if there are any judgments and realize you are not the thoughts? Can you accept the judgments going through you without hooking in to them, without believing them, without thinking them? Can you notice the space between you as awareness and everything that goes through your awareness? Can you put more focus in your awareness without pushing any movement away, just with bringing in more presence?

In our daily life, a way of practicing ahimsa, can be by noticing where we are being negative towards our selves or others. With becoming more conscious of this we can start creating a different choice. Every time we choose to appreciate or be grateful towards an experience, an other person or towards our selves, we train our mind and emotions to become more positive. Also the simple letting go of negative thinking, is enough to create more space within to let go of any negative emotion attached to it, in this letting go the experience of life most likely will change.

The more you praise and celebrate your life, the more there is in life to celebrate.
Oprah Winfrey

The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali

I find “The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali” to be one of the most inspiring books to dive deeper into meditation, and I love Maharishi Sadasiva Isham’s translation.

“Atha yoga anusasanam” he translates to “Now, the Teaching of Yoga”.
MSI beautifully describes his interpretation of this Sutra:
“Therefore the Science of Yoga begins and ends in the present moment. Everything to be understood about the transformation of life from suffering to permanent happiness, from failure to success, from ignorance to enlightenment is to be found in the present instant of time.”

The most effective way to find and stay in the present moment I know of, is through meditation. In meditation we can learn both to be present here and now, in what we are experiencing in our lives, in a way of bringing our awareness to what is in front of us now – instead of worrying about tomorrow or being caught in the actions of our past. Another benefit of meditation, which I also deeply appreciate, is to get in touch with and experience the still presence within – this inner experience is beautiful. Since most of us are used to thinking and letting our thoughts cloud our perception of this presence, we more often need tools to get us out of our heads and into our presence. This is where meditation can bring us back here and now.

Several studies have now shown that meditation, amongst other benefits, is reducing the stress levels of the body, lowering the blood pressure, balancing the hormones and even increasing the grey matter of the brain: www.washingtonpost.com

eckhart

Muladhara – balancing the first Chakra

“The clearest way into the Universe is through a forest of wilderness”
John Muir

Do you ever feel too much “in the head”, stressed out or ungrounded.

The quickest way to unwind and release stress I’ve found is spending time in nature or in meditation or even better – both at the same time. Spending time in nature balances our whole body and refills our energies. Nature helps us both in letting go of negativity and filling up on positive energy. The same goes for meditation, when we learn to rest in the silent place within, we recharge, let go and fill up with positivity.

In my book “Be the Alchemist of Your Life” I share different ways to connect and strengthen your first chakra – Muladhara. This chakra is designed to keep us grounded, connected and have a security in getting our basic needs met:

“The ruby can give us an awareness of others’ feelings and strengthens our compassionate nature. This gemstone can balance a driven and ambitious individual to honor the body and align the will and goals of his or her higher self.

The masculine, warrior side of us learns to honor the earth and the divine feminine and realizes that this side needs nurturing and love, so it will align the forceful creative side with an inner state of love and then create in accordance to the heart, instead of from brute force. If you have a strong ambitious side that is driven by a strong force forward, the ruby can aid you in aligning your will with your heart and higher self so you stay with your creations in accordance to your highest will.

When aligning with the ruby’s highest powers, we can connect with our inner healer, which is deeply compassionate and devoted to spirituality, while still being part of the material world.”

“Muladhara, the base chakra, is also referred to as the survival chakra. When this chakra is properly developed, we feel safe in the world. We feel supported on the physical plane and confident in getting our basic needs met.

Confidence, trust, feeling safe, being grounded and at one with life, tending to our basic needs, and taking good care of our bodies are all qualities that support us in keeping the first chakra balanced.”

“Be the Alchemist of Your Life”
BeTheAlchemistOfYourLife

 

Emerson

Autumn reflections

autumn

I was out walking today and suddenly a feeling of spring went through me, you know that feeling when you can hear in the chirps of the birds that they are happier, and there is a certain smell in the air and it brings with it promises of new experiences and happy times. Then in a blink of an eye, I remembered it is autumn and my heart dropped a bit, but then I was reminded again that actually I have grown to love this time of year too. Now the evenings are getting colder and darker and I can be happy just staying inside with cocoa, a good book or maybe too many episodes of “Modern Family” on Netflix. Before I would get low and depressed this time of year, now I have found ways of staying happy through meditation, yoga and connecting more with nature. Sharing here a poem about letting go while the autumn leaves are falling.

When you no longer control
and what you fear will happen
is played out,
so you can move on.

When you think you loose,
but in truth you are being pushed
along your golden brick road
waiting there for your steps.

When what you loose
and have held so dear
turns out to be
what has kept you
from the intimacy
you thought you had.

When what you loose
was your prison
and your love
shows a yearning
you couldn’t see
before you are close up
and finally free.

Inspiration from my brick wall

Inspiration

Through some years of inner search and meditation, what I have found up to this point is that one of my deepest longings and highest dreams, are freedom. Freedom can be many things and for me the ultimate freedom is to have freedom from negative thinking and limiting beliefs. No distracting thoughts, no negative judgments, viewing the world from a peaceful mind and an inner state of happiness.

Throughout my life I have created different experiences in the search of finding an answer to this longing for freedom. Some of these experiences have been negative in a way of feeling trapped so I could experience the freedom of getting out of that entrapment. When our longings are unconscious, we can some times create negative experiences in order to reach what we are searching for on a deeper level.

But most of the experiences have been beautiful: finding freedom in a peaceful mind, freedom in traveling, freedom in connecting with nature, freedom in loving someone without conditions, freedom in viewing the world without limitations, freedom when the barriers between people dissolve, freedom in choosing what my hearts wants over my head, freedom in choosing what I love to work with.

Have you connected to your deepest longing? Can you recognize how you can create this longing in positive or negative ways? Do you take steps towards following your highest dream every day?

I get inspired by this quote by Albert Camus:
“The only way to deal with an unfree world is to become so absolutely free that your very existence is an act of rebellion”